TU Berlin

Quality and Usability LabSteven Schmidt

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Steven Schmidt

Q&U
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Research Field

  • Quality of Experience (QoE) for Cloud Gaming Services
  • Engagement in Virtual Reality

Research Topics

  • Identification and quantification of perceptual quality dimensions for gaming QoE
  • Prediction of gaming QoE based on encoding and network parameters
  • Classification of game content
  • Crowdsourcing for gaming evaluation

Biography

Steven Schmidt received his M.Sc. degree in Electrical Engineering at the TU Berlin with a major in Communication Systems. Since 2016 he is employed as a research assistant at the Quality and Usability Lab where he is working towards a PhD in the field of Quality of Experience in Mobile Gaming. 

Projects

ITU-T SG12 Activities:

  • ITU-T Rec. G.1032 - Influence Factors on Gaming Quality of Experience (2017)
  • ITU-T Rec. P.809 - Subjective Evaluation Methods for Gaming Quality (2018)
  • ITU-T Rec. G.1072 - Opinion Model Predicting Gaming QoE for Cloud Gaming Services (2020)

Address

Quality and Usability Lab
Technische Universität Berlin
Ernst-Reuter-Platz 7
D-10587 Berlin, Germany

Tel:  +49 151 12044969

Publications

Investigating the Relationship of Mental Immersion and Physiological Measures during Cloud Gaming
Citation key schmidt2020b
Author Schmidt, Steven and Uhrig, Stefan and Reuschel, Domenic
Title of Book 2020 Twelfth International Conference on Quality of Multimedia Experience (QoMEX)
Pages 1–6
Year 2020
ISBN 978-1-7281-5965-2
DOI 10.1109/QoMEX48832.2020.9123133
Location Athlone, Ireland
Month may
Publisher IEEE
Series QoMEX ’20
How Published Fullpaper
Abstract The ultimate goal of designing game applications is to evoke a state of mental immersion in human users. Recently, advancing and very promising cloud gaming services catch high interest of the research community and industry. Cloud gaming services reduce computational costs of a client by outsourcing the game logic and rendering to a remote server. Consequently, the degree to which a game runs smoothly and enables uninterrupted interaction depends on impairments of the network connection between client and server. Furthermore, the visibility of such impairments may be constrained by properties of the visual display at the client-side. The present paper investigates the impact of common network impairments (bit rate, delay, packet loss) and screen size (small, medium, large) on mental immersion. In addition to traditional subjective assessment using the Immersive Experience Questionnaire (IEQ), also less intrusive, continuous physiological methods are employed (electrocardiography, ECG; electro-dermal activity, EDA). Participants engaged in playing an action platform computer game under different combinations of network impairments and screen sizes. Results revealed a small main effect of screen size on gaming Quality of Experience and real-world dissociation ratings between the small and medium screen size. Effects of network impairments on all IEQ scales were significant and also manifested as increased heart rate variability for packet loss. Besides, positive correlations were found between IEQ scales and heart rate variability. These findings suggest that network impairments influencing gameplay interaction might be of higher importance for immersive experience than varying screen size. Heart rate variability shows promise as a useful ECG measure in future studies on gaming immersion.
Link to publication Link to original publication Download Bibtex entry

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